Documentary: Thinking Money

Thinking Money: The Psychology Behind Our Best and Worst Financial Decisions

Host Dave Coyne leads viewers through an exploration of what behavioral economics has to tell us about why we spend, save (or don’t save) and the way we think about money. Dave travels the country meeting some of the innovative thinkers who mix economics with psychology. Their experiments and insights into our financial behavior will enlighten and amuse us as we learn to recognize how our brains and the marketplace can trick us into spending money we shouldn’t.

Thinking Money

A mix of fascinating theory and practical takeaways, Thinking Money is designed to decrease the stress and increase the bandwidth in our lives.

“Thinking Money: The Psychology Behind Our Best and Worst Financial Decisions” uses a mix of humor, on-the-street interviews and provocative insights from innovative thinkers to explore why we spend, why we save (or don’t) and how we think about money. Travel from Wall Street to Main Street, and from the halls of academia to the Santa Barbara wine country, to find out how our brains—and the marketplace—affect how we deal with money.


Watch the complete documentary Thinking Money online via the Maryland Public Television.
Website: www.MPT.org/ThinkingMoney


Watch the complete documentary Thinking Money online via the Maryland Public Television.

Produced by Rocket Media in association with FINRA Investor Education Foundation. Presented by Maryland Public Televisions (MPT) and distributed by American Public Television (APT).


Thinking Money explores an array of challenging ideas and findings that have profound implications for our financial behavior, including:

• How Americans’ increasing financial fragility has led to an explosion of “downmarket” and predatory sources of credit. There are now more payday loan stores in America than all the McDonald’s, Starbucks and Targets combined;
• Why too many choices can be paralyzing when it comes to small decisions, and big ones;
• How having a good “nudge” — especially one with an unpleasant consequence attached to it — can help you achieve your financial goals;
• In what way “confirmation bias,” the tendency for us to search for evidence that confirms what we already believe and disregard evidence that doesn’t, impacts our financial decisions; and
• How employers are using “choice architecture” and “the power of defaults” to help us put money into savings.